Mis abuelas y la Teología [My Grandmothers and Theology]

Author's Note: To my abuelas whose powerful-selves, including their voices, no quedan en el cajon de los recuerdos (are not in the box of memories). This writing does not intend to speak for the experience of all the abuelas and comunidades living in the liminal spaces of the dominant culture. Rather, this writing departs from … Continue reading Mis abuelas y la Teología [My Grandmothers and Theology]

Getting Back to “Community”

What makes for meaningful conversation among young people today? These reflections triggered a distinct memory of observing my son’s middle school dance years ago. At pick up time, upon entering the church hall, most of the students were sitting at their respective tables, staring into their phones with their fingers rapidly texting each other rather … Continue reading Getting Back to “Community”

The Liminality of Dangling Man by Saul Bellow

It can be hard to convey liminality in words. The feelings that come from living through a liminal experience often go beyond our means to express them adequately. Liminality, being deeply tied to experience, isn’t easily translatable into words and ideas. As such, we’re left with using an arrangement of interesting metaphors and imagery in … Continue reading The Liminality of Dangling Man by Saul Bellow

The Negro Spirituals as a Form of Theology in the “Invisible Institution” (Part 2)

Note: Part 1 is available here To begin with, the slaves demonstrated the same faith in God the liberator as the Hebrews did when they left Egypt; they did so by remembering and believing in His Word of promise. The Hebrews had no way of knowing if or how He would save them from Pharaoh … Continue reading The Negro Spirituals as a Form of Theology in the “Invisible Institution” (Part 2)

The Negro Spirituals as a Form of Theology in the “Invisible Institution” (Part 1)

While within the “invisible institutions” of the hush/brush arbors (the equivalent to a modern-day Black Christian church) preaching, dance, and prayer were common forms used as expressions of religion and the Black Theology of the slaves, the unique art form of Black music that the slaves developed, the Spirituals, was noticeably the most expressive form … Continue reading The Negro Spirituals as a Form of Theology in the “Invisible Institution” (Part 1)